7 replaced http://physics.stackexchange.com/ with https://physics.stackexchange.com/
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1) Very good initiative! First of all, titles should be informative about the physics question. When a user reads the frontpagefrontpage of Physics.SE, he (or she) should at least have a general idea what a question is about before clicking on it. Usually it is good to pose the title as a question, but ultimately it is more important that it is informative about the physics topic.

2) Moreover, avoid abbreviations in the title. If an abbreviation is only explained in the question formulation, one still has to click it to find out.

The following is not directly related to the opening post, but rather a couple of scattered thoughts on how to write questions (which someone in the future may write up as, say, an extended version of the faqfaq on how to ask questions ).

3) In the question formulation, if you are reading a book, and there is something in that book you don't understand and you want to ask about, please give the reference! In fact, in different areas of physics, notions can mean completely different things! By providing a reference, you ensure that the answers will be much more focused and useful to you.

4) When linking to the arXiv, link to the abstract page rather than the pdf file.

5) When linking preferably use perma-links if possible to prevent link rot.

1) Very good initiative! First of all, titles should be informative about the physics question. When a user reads the frontpage of Physics.SE, he (or she) should at least have a general idea what a question is about before clicking on it. Usually it is good to pose the title as a question, but ultimately it is more important that it is informative about the physics topic.

2) Moreover, avoid abbreviations in the title. If an abbreviation is only explained in the question formulation, one still has to click it to find out.

The following is not directly related to the opening post, but rather a couple of scattered thoughts on how to write questions (which someone in the future may write up as, say, an extended version of the faq on how to ask questions ).

3) In the question formulation, if you are reading a book, and there is something in that book you don't understand and you want to ask about, please give the reference! In fact, in different areas of physics, notions can mean completely different things! By providing a reference, you ensure that the answers will be much more focused and useful to you.

4) When linking to the arXiv, link to the abstract page rather than the pdf file.

5) When linking preferably use perma-links if possible to prevent link rot.

1) Very good initiative! First of all, titles should be informative about the physics question. When a user reads the frontpage of Physics.SE, he (or she) should at least have a general idea what a question is about before clicking on it. Usually it is good to pose the title as a question, but ultimately it is more important that it is informative about the physics topic.

2) Moreover, avoid abbreviations in the title. If an abbreviation is only explained in the question formulation, one still has to click it to find out.

The following is not directly related to the opening post, but rather a couple of scattered thoughts on how to write questions (which someone in the future may write up as, say, an extended version of the faq on how to ask questions ).

3) In the question formulation, if you are reading a book, and there is something in that book you don't understand and you want to ask about, please give the reference! In fact, in different areas of physics, notions can mean completely different things! By providing a reference, you ensure that the answers will be much more focused and useful to you.

4) When linking to the arXiv, link to the abstract page rather than the pdf file.

5) When linking preferably use perma-links if possible to prevent link rot.

6 removed a couple of unnecessary sentences
source | link

1) Very good initiative! First of all, titles should be informative about the physics question. When a user reads the frontpage of Physics.SE, he (or she) should at least have a general idea what a question is about before clicking on it. Usually it is good to pose the title as a question, but ultimately it is more important that it is informative about the physics topic.

2) Moreover, avoid abbreviations in the title. If an abbreviation is only explained in the question formulation, one still has to click it to find out.

The following is not directly related to the opening post, but rather a couple of scattered thoughts on how to write questions (which someone in the future may write up as, say, an extended version of the faq on how to ask questions ).

3) In the question formulation, if you are reading a book, and there is something in that book you don't understand and you want to ask about, please give the reference! This may sound obvious, but for some reason Physics.SE is dotted with examples of questions where no reference is initially provided. Just because one book defines a physical notion in a certain way, it does not necessarily mean that it is universally accepted and every author uses the same definition. In fact, in different areas of physics, notions can mean completely different things! By providing a reference, you ensure that the answers will be much more focused and useful to you.

4) When linking to the arXiv, link to the abstract page rather than the pdf file.

5) When linking to other questions/answers on Physics.SE,preferably use their perma-links if possible to prevent link rot.

1) Very good initiative! First of all, titles should be informative about the physics question. When a user reads the frontpage of Physics.SE, he (or she) should at least have a general idea what a question is about before clicking on it. Usually it is good to pose the title as a question, but ultimately it is more important that it is informative about the physics topic.

2) Moreover, avoid abbreviations in the title. If an abbreviation is only explained in the question formulation, one still has to click it to find out.

The following is not directly related to the opening post, but rather a couple of scattered thoughts on how to write questions (which someone in the future may write up as, say, an extended version of the faq on how to ask questions ).

3) In the question formulation, if you are reading a book, and there is something in that book you don't understand and you want to ask about, please give the reference! This may sound obvious, but for some reason Physics.SE is dotted with examples of questions where no reference is initially provided. Just because one book defines a physical notion in a certain way, it does not necessarily mean that it is universally accepted and every author uses the same definition. In fact, in different areas of physics, notions can mean completely different things! By providing a reference, you ensure that the answers will be much more focused and useful to you.

4) When linking to the arXiv, link to the abstract page rather than the pdf file.

5) When linking to other questions/answers on Physics.SE, use their perma-links to prevent link rot.

1) Very good initiative! First of all, titles should be informative about the physics question. When a user reads the frontpage of Physics.SE, he (or she) should at least have a general idea what a question is about before clicking on it. Usually it is good to pose the title as a question, but ultimately it is more important that it is informative about the physics topic.

2) Moreover, avoid abbreviations in the title. If an abbreviation is only explained in the question formulation, one still has to click it to find out.

The following is not directly related to the opening post, but rather a couple of scattered thoughts on how to write questions (which someone in the future may write up as, say, an extended version of the faq on how to ask questions ).

3) In the question formulation, if you are reading a book, and there is something in that book you don't understand and you want to ask about, please give the reference! In fact, in different areas of physics, notions can mean completely different things! By providing a reference, you ensure that the answers will be much more focused and useful to you.

4) When linking to the arXiv, link to the abstract page rather than the pdf file.

5) When linking preferably use perma-links if possible to prevent link rot.

5 removed one sentence because of comment by Tobias Kienzler
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1) Very good initiative! First of all, titles should be informative about the physics question. When a user reads the frontpage of Physics.SE, he (or she) should at least have a general idea what a question is about before clicking on it. Usually it is good to pose the title as a question, but ultimately it is more important that it is informative about the physics topic.

2) Moreover, avoid abbreviations in the title. If an abbreviation is only explained in the question formulation, one still havehas to click it to find out.

The following is not directly related to the opening post, but rather a couple of scattered thoughts on how to write questions (which someone in the future may write up as, say, an extended version of the faq on how to ask questions ).

3) In the question formulation, if you are reading a book, and there is something in that book you don't understand and you want to ask about, please give the reference! This may sound obvious, but for some reason Physics.SE is dotted with examples of questions where no reference is initially provided. Just because one book defines a physical notion in a certain way, it does not necessarily mean that it is universally accepted and every author uses the same definition. In fact, in different areas of physics, notions can mean completely different things! By providing a reference, you ensure that the answers will be much more focused and useful to you.

4) When linking to the arXiv, link to the abstract page rather than the pdf file.

5) When linking to other questions/answers on Physics.SE, use their perma-links to prevent link rot. Link rot can e.g. happen if the title of the linked question is changed.

1) Very good initiative! First of all, titles should be informative about the physics question. When a user reads the frontpage of Physics.SE, he (or she) should at least have a general idea what a question is about before clicking on it. Usually it is good to pose the title as a question, but ultimately it is more important that it is informative about the physics topic.

2) Moreover, avoid abbreviations in the title. If an abbreviation is only explained in the question formulation, one still have to click it to find out.

The following is not directly related to the opening post, but rather a couple of scattered thoughts on how to write questions (which someone in the future may write up as, say, an extended version of the faq on how to ask questions ).

3) In the question formulation, if you are reading a book, and there is something in that book you don't understand and you want to ask about, please give the reference! This may sound obvious, but for some reason Physics.SE is dotted with examples of questions where no reference is initially provided. Just because one book defines a physical notion in a certain way, it does not necessarily mean that it is universally accepted and every author uses the same definition. In fact, in different areas of physics, notions can mean completely different things! By providing a reference, you ensure that the answers will be much more focused and useful to you.

4) When linking to the arXiv, link to the abstract page rather than the pdf file.

5) When linking to other questions/answers on Physics.SE, use their perma-links to prevent link rot. Link rot can e.g. happen if the title of the linked question is changed.

1) Very good initiative! First of all, titles should be informative about the physics question. When a user reads the frontpage of Physics.SE, he (or she) should at least have a general idea what a question is about before clicking on it. Usually it is good to pose the title as a question, but ultimately it is more important that it is informative about the physics topic.

2) Moreover, avoid abbreviations in the title. If an abbreviation is only explained in the question formulation, one still has to click it to find out.

The following is not directly related to the opening post, but rather a couple of scattered thoughts on how to write questions (which someone in the future may write up as, say, an extended version of the faq on how to ask questions ).

3) In the question formulation, if you are reading a book, and there is something in that book you don't understand and you want to ask about, please give the reference! This may sound obvious, but for some reason Physics.SE is dotted with examples of questions where no reference is initially provided. Just because one book defines a physical notion in a certain way, it does not necessarily mean that it is universally accepted and every author uses the same definition. In fact, in different areas of physics, notions can mean completely different things! By providing a reference, you ensure that the answers will be much more focused and useful to you.

4) When linking to the arXiv, link to the abstract page rather than the pdf file.

5) When linking to other questions/answers on Physics.SE, use their perma-links to prevent link rot.

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