3 added 33 characters in body
source | link

Interesting thread. I read all the answers and comments and want to formulate something which is maybe implied by other comments but which I haven't seen put like that: I'd say the amount of low level questions just directly correlates with the fact that the SE portal is more known now.

I hang around in a hackerspace sometimes, which is filled with hobbyists, and professional programmers, non-academics, people who do Khan academy and the Euler project, know how to build microcontrolers but which have never heard about the lambda calculus, the Gamma functionarXiv or the arXivGamma function. And now - as opposed to 2 years ago - these kind of communities know ofabout StackExchange. People now know that there are "forums" on the internet, which pretty accurately can be described as "like google, but you can also ask a question if you don't get the answer the first time".

The StackOverflow sites started as a programming site. I came to know StackExchange via the first spin of MathOverflow as a late physics undergrad as "hey, check this out! There is a Q&A site on the web where you can get TERRENCE TAO, the cute fields medalist, to answer your math questions!". Today the existence of the StackExchange sites are "public" and you must consider that every one of the 200 different engineering degrees have bad introductory physics courses, where they force people to learn 200 years of physics insights in two times 4 months. Of course they will come here, and of course, they will not be check beforehand if theytheir questions have already been formulated here in some othersimilar way. (I'd even say they are rational in not doing the latter - there isn't a global community moral, where you put your interests last, just to not disturb the efficiency of a commercial website. People want their questions cleared and it's without consequences if they piss off the virtual community circle of others.)

So my conclusion is, if you don't want the indian engineers to take over the physics site (disclaimer: that's not supposed to be any offence in any way! It's just a huge bulk of people), then you can't display SE Physics as a web site where they will get their second semester answers.

Interesting thread. I read all the answers and comments and want to formulate something which is maybe implied by other comments but which I haven't seen put like that: I'd say the amount of low level questions just directly correlates with the fact that the SE portal is more known now.

I hang around in a hackerspace sometimes, filled with hobbyists, and professional programmers, non-academics, people who do Khan academy and the Euler project, know how to build microcontrolers but which have never heard about the lambda calculus, the Gamma function or the arXiv. And now - opposed to 2 years ago - these kind of communities know of StackExchange. People now know that there are "forums" on the internet, which pretty accurately can be described as "like google, but you can also ask a question if you don't get the answer the first time".

The StackOverflow sites started as a programming site. I came to know StackExchange via the first spin of MathOverflow as a late physics undergrad as "hey, check this out! There is a Q&A site on the web where you can get TERRENCE TAO, the cute fields medalist, to answer your math questions!". Today the existence of the StackExchange sites are "public" and you must consider that every one of the 200 different engineering degrees have bad introductory physics courses, where they force people to learn 200 years of insights in two times 4 months. Of course they will come here, and of course, they will not be check if they questions have already been formulated here in some other way. (I'd even say they are rational in not doing the latter - there isn't a global community moral, where you put your interests last, just to not disturb the efficiency of a commercial website. People want their questions cleared and it's without consequences if they piss off the virtual community circle of others.)

So my conclusion is, if you don't want the indian engineers to take over the physics site (disclaimer: that's not supposed to be any offence in any way! It's just a huge bulk of people), then you can't display SE Physics as a web site where they will get their second semester answers.

Interesting thread. I read all the answers and comments and want to formulate something which is maybe implied by other comments but which I haven't seen put like that: I'd say the amount of low level questions just directly correlates with the fact that the SE portal is more known now.

I hang around in a hackerspace sometimes, which is filled with hobbyists and professional programmers, non-academics, people who do Khan academy and the Euler project, know how to build microcontrolers but which have never heard about the lambda calculus, the arXiv or the Gamma function. And now - as opposed to 2 years ago - these kind of communities know about StackExchange. People now know that there are "forums" on the internet, which pretty accurately can be described as "like google, but you can also ask a question if you don't get the answer the first time".

The StackOverflow sites started as a programming site. I came to know StackExchange via the first spin of MathOverflow as a late physics undergrad as "hey, check this out! There is a Q&A site on the web where you can get TERRENCE TAO, the cute fields medalist, to answer your math questions!". Today the existence of the StackExchange sites are "public" and you must consider that every one of the 200 different engineering degrees have bad introductory physics courses, where they force people to learn 200 years of physics insights in two times 4 months. Of course they will come here, and of course, they will not check beforehand if their questions have already been formulated here in some similar way. (I'd even say they are rational in not doing the latter - there isn't a global community moral, where you put your interests last, just to not disturb the efficiency of a commercial website. People want their questions cleared and it's without consequences if they piss off the virtual community circle of others.)

So my conclusion is, if you don't want the indian engineers to take over the physics site (disclaimer: that's not supposed to be any offence in any way! It's just a huge bulk of people), then you can't display SE Physics as a web site where they will get their second semester answers.

2 added 22 characters in body
source | link

Interesting thread. I read all the answers and comments and want to formulate something which is maybe implied by other comments but which I haven't seen put like that: I'd say the amount of low level questions just directly correlates with the fact that the SE portal is more known now. 

I hang around in a hackerspace sometimes, filled with hobbyists, and professional programmers, non-academics, people who do Khan academy and the Euler project, know how to build microcontrolers but which have never heard about the lambda calculus, the Gamma function or the arXiv. And now - opposed to 2 years ago - these kind of communities know of StackExchange. People now know that there are "forums" on the internet, which pretty accurately can be described as "like google, but you can also ask a question if you don't get the answer the first time". 

The StackOverflow sites started as a programming site. I came to know StackExchange via the first spin of MathOverflow as a late physics undergrad as "hey, check this out! There is a Q&A site on the web where you can get TERRENCE TAO, the cute fields medalist, to answer your math questions!". NowToday the existence of the StackExchange sites are "public" and you must consider that every one of the 200 different engineering degrees have bad introductory physics courses, where they force people to learn 200 years of insights in one 2two times 4 months. Of course they will come here, and of course, they will not be check if they questions have already been formulated here in some other way. (I'd even say they are rational in not doing the latter - there isn't a global community moral, where you put your interests last, just to not disturb the efficiency of a commertialcommercial website. TheyPeople want their answersquestions cleared and it's without consequences if they piss off the virtual community circle of others.) 

So my facitconclusion is, if you don't want the indian engineers to take over the physics site (disclaimer: that's not supposed to be any offence in any way! It's just a huge bulk of people.), then you can't display SE Physics as a pageweb site where they will get their second semester answers.

Interesting thread. I read all the answers and comments and want to formulate something which is maybe implied by other comments but which I haven't seen put like that: I'd say the amount of low level questions just directly correlates with the fact that the SE portal is more known now. I hang around in a hackerspace sometimes, filled with hobbyists, and professional programmers, non-academics, people who do Khan academy and the Euler project, know how to build microcontrolers but which have never heard about the lambda calculus, the Gamma function or the arXiv. And now - opposed to 2 years ago - these kind of communities know of StackExchange. People now know that there are "forums" on the internet, which pretty accurately can be described as "like google, but you can also ask a question if you don't get the answer the first time". The StackOverflow sites started as a programming site. I came to know StackExchange via the first spin of MathOverflow as a late physics undergrad as "hey, check this out! There is a Q&A site on the web where you can get TERRENCE TAO, the cute fields medalist to answer your questions!". Now the existence of the StackExchange sites are "public" and you must consider that every one of the 200 different engineering degrees have bad introductory physics courses, where they force people to learn 200 years of insights in one 2 times 4 months. Of course they will come here, and of course, they will not be check if they questions have already been formulated here in some other way. (I'd even say they are rational in not doing the latter - there isn't a global community moral, where you put your interests last to not disturb the efficiency of a commertial website. They want their answers and it's without consequences if they piss off the virtual community circle of others.) So my facit is, if you don't want the indian engineers to take over the physics site (disclaimer: that's not supposed to be any offence in any way! It's just a huge bulk of people.), then you can't display SE Physics as a page where they will get their second semester answers.

Interesting thread. I read all the answers and comments and want to formulate something which is maybe implied by other comments but which I haven't seen put like that: I'd say the amount of low level questions just directly correlates with the fact that the SE portal is more known now. 

I hang around in a hackerspace sometimes, filled with hobbyists, and professional programmers, non-academics, people who do Khan academy and the Euler project, know how to build microcontrolers but which have never heard about the lambda calculus, the Gamma function or the arXiv. And now - opposed to 2 years ago - these kind of communities know of StackExchange. People now know that there are "forums" on the internet, which pretty accurately can be described as "like google, but you can also ask a question if you don't get the answer the first time". 

The StackOverflow sites started as a programming site. I came to know StackExchange via the first spin of MathOverflow as a late physics undergrad as "hey, check this out! There is a Q&A site on the web where you can get TERRENCE TAO, the cute fields medalist, to answer your math questions!". Today the existence of the StackExchange sites are "public" and you must consider that every one of the 200 different engineering degrees have bad introductory physics courses, where they force people to learn 200 years of insights in two times 4 months. Of course they will come here, and of course, they will not be check if they questions have already been formulated here in some other way. (I'd even say they are rational in not doing the latter - there isn't a global community moral, where you put your interests last, just to not disturb the efficiency of a commercial website. People want their questions cleared and it's without consequences if they piss off the virtual community circle of others.) 

So my conclusion is, if you don't want the indian engineers to take over the physics site (disclaimer: that's not supposed to be any offence in any way! It's just a huge bulk of people), then you can't display SE Physics as a web site where they will get their second semester answers.

1
source | link

Interesting thread. I read all the answers and comments and want to formulate something which is maybe implied by other comments but which I haven't seen put like that: I'd say the amount of low level questions just directly correlates with the fact that the SE portal is more known now. I hang around in a hackerspace sometimes, filled with hobbyists, and professional programmers, non-academics, people who do Khan academy and the Euler project, know how to build microcontrolers but which have never heard about the lambda calculus, the Gamma function or the arXiv. And now - opposed to 2 years ago - these kind of communities know of StackExchange. People now know that there are "forums" on the internet, which pretty accurately can be described as "like google, but you can also ask a question if you don't get the answer the first time". The StackOverflow sites started as a programming site. I came to know StackExchange via the first spin of MathOverflow as a late physics undergrad as "hey, check this out! There is a Q&A site on the web where you can get TERRENCE TAO, the cute fields medalist to answer your questions!". Now the existence of the StackExchange sites are "public" and you must consider that every one of the 200 different engineering degrees have bad introductory physics courses, where they force people to learn 200 years of insights in one 2 times 4 months. Of course they will come here, and of course, they will not be check if they questions have already been formulated here in some other way. (I'd even say they are rational in not doing the latter - there isn't a global community moral, where you put your interests last to not disturb the efficiency of a commertial website. They want their answers and it's without consequences if they piss off the virtual community circle of others.) So my facit is, if you don't want the indian engineers to take over the physics site (disclaimer: that's not supposed to be any offence in any way! It's just a huge bulk of people.), then you can't display SE Physics as a page where they will get their second semester answers.