3 replaced http://physics.stackexchange.com/ with https://physics.stackexchange.com/
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User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

Without the 50 reputation barrier for posting comments, it's fair to say that User X has the ability to completely ruin a good portion of the site in about 30 minutes, especially if one of the moderators isn't around.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. Yet when User Y begins exploring, he sees the work of User X and other spammers everywhere. Saddened that Physics Stack Exchange has become one more crappy Internet forum, User Y leaves forever.


Let's try that again.

User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

User X tries to comment, but quickly learns that he must first gain 50 rep. He decides to start asking and answering questions with lots of spam. It is harder for him to do so because high-rep users can delete posts that are offensive/spam/not-made-in-good-will[1][1],[2][2] (the same is not true for comments). User X is frustrated and soon leaves.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. He realizes that he needs to gain 50 rep to comment, and so he asks and answers questions, like he planned. Within a day, he has gained that amount and much more.

See the difference?

User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

Without the 50 reputation barrier for posting comments, it's fair to say that User X has the ability to completely ruin a good portion of the site in about 30 minutes, especially if one of the moderators isn't around.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. Yet when User Y begins exploring, he sees the work of User X and other spammers everywhere. Saddened that Physics Stack Exchange has become one more crappy Internet forum, User Y leaves forever.


Let's try that again.

User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

User X tries to comment, but quickly learns that he must first gain 50 rep. He decides to start asking and answering questions with lots of spam. It is harder for him to do so because high-rep users can delete posts that are offensive/spam/not-made-in-good-will[1],[2] (the same is not true for comments). User X is frustrated and soon leaves.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. He realizes that he needs to gain 50 rep to comment, and so he asks and answers questions, like he planned. Within a day, he has gained that amount and much more.

See the difference?

User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

Without the 50 reputation barrier for posting comments, it's fair to say that User X has the ability to completely ruin a good portion of the site in about 30 minutes, especially if one of the moderators isn't around.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. Yet when User Y begins exploring, he sees the work of User X and other spammers everywhere. Saddened that Physics Stack Exchange has become one more crappy Internet forum, User Y leaves forever.


Let's try that again.

User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

User X tries to comment, but quickly learns that he must first gain 50 rep. He decides to start asking and answering questions with lots of spam. It is harder for him to do so because high-rep users can delete posts that are offensive/spam/not-made-in-good-will[1],[2] (the same is not true for comments). User X is frustrated and soon leaves.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. He realizes that he needs to gain 50 rep to comment, and so he asks and answers questions, like he planned. Within a day, he has gained that amount and much more.

See the difference?

2 added 151 characters in body
source | link

User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

Without the 50 reputation barrier for posting comments, it's fair to say that User X has the ability to completely ruin a good portion of the site in about 30 minutes, especially if one of the moderators isn't around.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. Yet when User Y begins exploring, he sees the work of User X and other spammers everywhere. Saddened that Physics Stack Exchange has become one more crappy Internet forum, User Y leaves forever.


Let's try that again.

User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

User X tries to comment, but quickly learns that he must first gain 50 rep. He decides to start asking and answering questions with lots of spam. It is harder for him to do so because high-rep users can delete posts that are offensive/spam/not-made-in-good-will[1],[2] (the same is not true for comments). User X is frustrated and soon leaves.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. He realizes that he needs to gain 50 rep to comment, and so he asks and answers questions, like he planned. Within a day, he has gained that amount and much more.

See the difference?

User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

Without the 50 reputation barrier for posting comments, it's fair to say that User X has the ability to completely ruin a good portion of the site in about 30 minutes, especially if one of the moderators isn't around.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. Yet when User Y begins exploring, he sees the work of User X and other spammers everywhere. Saddened that Physics Stack Exchange has become one more crappy Internet forum, User Y leaves forever.


Let's try that again.

User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

User X tries to comment, but quickly learns that he must first gain 50 rep. He decides to start asking and answering questions with lots of spam. It is harder for him to do so because high-rep users can delete posts that are offensive/spam/not-made-in-good-will (the same is not true for comments). User X is frustrated and soon leaves.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. He realizes that he needs to gain 50 rep to comment, and so he asks and answers questions, like he planned. Within a day, he has gained that amount and much more.

See the difference?

User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

Without the 50 reputation barrier for posting comments, it's fair to say that User X has the ability to completely ruin a good portion of the site in about 30 minutes, especially if one of the moderators isn't around.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. Yet when User Y begins exploring, he sees the work of User X and other spammers everywhere. Saddened that Physics Stack Exchange has become one more crappy Internet forum, User Y leaves forever.


Let's try that again.

User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

User X tries to comment, but quickly learns that he must first gain 50 rep. He decides to start asking and answering questions with lots of spam. It is harder for him to do so because high-rep users can delete posts that are offensive/spam/not-made-in-good-will[1],[2] (the same is not true for comments). User X is frustrated and soon leaves.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. He realizes that he needs to gain 50 rep to comment, and so he asks and answers questions, like he planned. Within a day, he has gained that amount and much more.

See the difference?

1
source | link

User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

Without the 50 reputation barrier for posting comments, it's fair to say that User X has the ability to completely ruin a good portion of the site in about 30 minutes, especially if one of the moderators isn't around.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. Yet when User Y begins exploring, he sees the work of User X and other spammers everywhere. Saddened that Physics Stack Exchange has become one more crappy Internet forum, User Y leaves forever.


Let's try that again.

User X joins Physics Stack Exchange, creates an account, and starts perusing the site. Unbeknownst to everyone else, User X is a spammer, and will do everything he can to add spam links, rude language, and offensive messages wherever he goes.

User X tries to comment, but quickly learns that he must first gain 50 rep. He decides to start asking and answering questions with lots of spam. It is harder for him to do so because high-rep users can delete posts that are offensive/spam/not-made-in-good-will (the same is not true for comments). User X is frustrated and soon leaves.

User Y joins Physics Stack Exchange. User Y cares about physics and about helping people. He's also curious, and wants to ask questions. He realizes that he needs to gain 50 rep to comment, and so he asks and answers questions, like he planned. Within a day, he has gained that amount and much more.

See the difference?