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It can be hard for people which are not formerly educated in the field of physics to properly tag a question that they are asking. So I think there should be a tag like "should be tagged by a moderator". Because somebody can be curious about some phenomena without knowing which branch of physics it is a member of.

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    $\begingroup$ Note that questions are expected to show some prior research, which makes it essentially impossible for OP to ask an on-topic question while at the same time being completely oblivious to the branch of physics the question corresponds to -- if they did conduct the necessary research, they must have found at least some keywords. In any case, users edit dozens of new questions on a daily basis, and no flag tag is required; editors are going to fix the tags anyway. $\endgroup$ – AccidentalFourierTransform Aug 9 '17 at 18:27
  • $\begingroup$ @AccidentalFourierTransform It is just a possibility that s/he finds a keyword. I think that it won't hurt anyone to add just another tag. $\endgroup$ – user165955 Aug 9 '17 at 18:30
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I just noticed that the tag is blacklisted, and that is probably a hint that SE does not want such tags.

You only need one tag to pose a question. If in serious doubt, you could e.g. try if some of the words in your question exist as tags. (Example: Your Phys.SE question here contains the word in the title...)

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The site is rather good (mostly through the efforts of Qmechanic) at re-tagging questions when the original tags are sub-optimal. If you're a new user and you're not sure quite how to tag something, just do your best effort and if the tags need editing then somebody will change them for you. (If you're really not sure, then just add a comment afterwards asking for help with the tags.) Don't sweat the tags too much - focus on the content.

As for an additional tag as you propose, it's (i) a meta tag, which we only use when they're really, really necessary, and (ii) unlikely to be discoverable by the bulk of the population that could use it, so it's unlikely to be helpful.

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