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I recently asked a question Can't we make big magnetic plate to levitate using gravity?. Maybe late, but I edited the question to prove it unique, but nothing seems to happen. Should I ask the question again? or ask users who marked it duplicate?

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  • $\begingroup$ it has right now gathered one vote to reopen. Nothing more to do until more similar votes come in. $\endgroup$ – ZeroTheHero Mar 31 at 3:50
  • $\begingroup$ physics.stackexchange.com/review/reopen/255214 $\endgroup$ – user191954 Mar 31 at 5:00
  • $\begingroup$ @ZeroTheHero Could you make that an answer? (Including Chair's link to the review page might be handy too, up to you) $\endgroup$ – David Z Apr 1 at 0:29
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In my opinion, your edit does nothing to make the question unique, because the other question covers everything that yours does. You say:

"The setup in suggested question, has a tendency to flip 180 deg, causing there opposite poles to stick and no levitation occurs, while in my setup, its impossible for disc to flip."

The other question is not asking about any specific setup. The question asks:

"I know that it's possible to make an object levitate using an electromagnet to hold it up. But is it also possible to do this with regular magnets? Is there a special kind of magnet I need in order to have one powerful enough to hold an object up?"

If you look at the answers to that question, you will also see that none of them discuss the specific setup directly, but instead are generically referring to all setups using static ferromagnets. They are only discussing the generic concept of levitating something with static magnets, the same as your question.

Your question is not really any different. You spend a lot of space showing pictures of plates, but your question asks if there is any way, not just why the plate example doesn't work (you even ask about a bowl setup, and if that would work, but then later in the edit say your question is only asking about flat plates?).

If you applied the actual mathematical analysis and ran into a conceptual difficulty, I could see this being on topic; but as of right now it's a very limited one-dimensional analysis of a 3-D problem that essentially ignores the actual physics (like why are there only vertical forces acting on your plate?).

The question is asking why you can't use static magnets for levitation; it was closed as a duplicate asking the same thing. The other question covers all shapes, so there's no real benefiet to having a new question for a specific geometric orientation; unless you have a conceptual related question (not just "how does that answer apply to flat plates?"). I don't think we need a question for each different possible shape of magnets when the post yours was marked as a duplicate of covers every geometry.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanx for your explanation. And yes, I also believe that we can't disprove some well tested and verified proofs, by some intuitions or discussion, but my problem is I don't know how to prove myself wrong, mathematically, that's why I preferred it asking here. $\endgroup$ – PranshuKhandal Apr 1 at 14:30
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It is slowly gathering votes to re-open; nothing to do until there is enough votes. The edit you made is extensive and this may help you (it’s quite a good edit as a matter of fact) but patience is the word.

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