1
$\begingroup$

In our comments and Answers Should we assume a proper level of safety precautions being taken?

$\endgroup$

migrated from physics.stackexchange.com Jun 5 '12 at 1:33

This question came from our site for active researchers, academics and students of physics.

1
$\begingroup$

It's not our job to explain safety precautions to people, if that's what you're wondering. The answers here, when they describe experiments, are meant to be read as "this is basically how X might be done" rather than "here is how to do X" - in other words, we're just conveying knowledge about what is involved in running a particular experiment, not providing instructions on how to actually do it. If someone wants to carry out an experiment described in an answer, it's their responsibility to do whatever additional research is necessary to find or develop a proper set of instructions, including safety precautions.

As sort of a corollary to that, if someone asks whether some particular procedure or effect is safe, or about how to do something safely, it's off topic for the site. We can answer questions about the effects of a certain amount of a physical phenomenon, though. For example, "What are the effects of running current through a human body?" is a fine question, but "How much current can safely run through a human body?" is not. If someone asks in a comment whether something is safe or not, it's best to either not answer, or just say you can't address that.

$\endgroup$
  • $\begingroup$ I've down voted this because the idea that asking for safety considerations of an experimental procedure is off topic is a massive disservice to experimentalist users. It is also bizarre to anyone who works in a lab. Physics courses contain safety information on included lab experiments. To an experimental physicist safety considerations are an integral part of daily life in the lab. $\endgroup$ – DanielSank Jul 2 '15 at 15:41
  • $\begingroup$ Furthermore, asking about safety considerations of e.g. lasers, cryogenic liquids, or certain compounds are questions only a physicist can answer. As such, these questions have the same relevance as math questions that only physicists can answer, which we obviously allow. $\endgroup$ – DanielSank Jul 2 '15 at 15:41
1
$\begingroup$

I've been trying to keep in mind my own mixture competence and insane lack of regard for personal safety around my fourteenth birthday.

More specifically I look for work that can be done safely in a home environment and I try to specify what safety gear you should wear and/or have on hand.

$\endgroup$

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .