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I consider the question in this post to be a conceptual question. This is because OP didn't understand which time interval to calculate - the question wasn't about the calculation itself.

Additionally I provided a hint which I think is in accordance with the current policy. Isn't it?

Although I do admit that after that, I said that I will provide a complete answer to the problem if OP doesn't manage to solve it themselves. At the time of posting the answer, I had not read the following:

If someone posts an answer to a homework-type question that gives away a complete or near-complete solution, in most cases it will be temporarily deleted.

I have since deleted that part of my answer. My apologies, I'm quite new to the site :)

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It's not really a conceptual question, at least not what one usually means by conceptual. A conceptual question is one that asks about physics concepts. This does exclude questions that only ask for calculations, but this doesn't mean that any question that doesn't involve a computation is conceptual.

The post in question here is really just asking how to interpret an unclear question. It's not really asking how to understand a physics concept, but rather how to parse a question. Additionally, one would need to work out the problem to check the work of the OP in order to verify/refute the answer by the OP.

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  • $\begingroup$ Your point is indeed valid, considering the definition you used for "conceptual". However, I don't think the question in the exercise is unclear at all. Rather, I think that OP is probably not familiar enough with physics questions, and therefore needed help on how to interpret (conceptualize) it. Although it is indeed not a question regarding physics concepts, it is a question on how to interpret (conceptualize) physics problems. As you can already understand, I'm using a slightly different definition of "conceptual". $\endgroup$ May 12 at 19:12
  • $\begingroup$ Whether or not it would be healthy for this site to allow asking such questions, i.e. questions regarding the question itself, I'm not sure; maybe you are right. $\endgroup$ May 12 at 19:12

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