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In posts on a PSE Q&A, I found two diagrams in this answer, each connected to verbiage by arrows in a sequence that conflicts with information in a more recent NASA video. As my experience posting graphics on a computer is nonexistent, am I limited to pointing out that conflict in a comment, without obtaining any credit for the two edits needed?

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    $\begingroup$ Could you clarify, with links to the questions involved? It's not clear what you want to do—or whether it's even possible or appropriate. $\endgroup$
    – Buzz Mod
    Aug 9 at 4:28
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    $\begingroup$ I don’t see why a conflict with a NASA video should justify changing someone’s post. If you think the post is incorrect, you should downvote it. $\endgroup$
    – Ghoster
    Aug 9 at 5:55
  • $\begingroup$ not sure why you should refer to this answer as “verbiage”. Maybe it is but as a non-expert in the field I would certainly not use this language. $\endgroup$ Aug 10 at 1:53
  • $\begingroup$ @ZeroTheHero --I'm sure a non-expert in the field of physics (I'm a retired interpreter, having worked mainly for telephone systems), but I have to wonder if you might've felt "verbiage" to be derogatory, like "garbage": In fact, it just refers to phrases containing one or more verbs. $\endgroup$
    – Edouard
    Aug 11 at 1:18
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    $\begingroup$ please see the MW definition which refers to “little or obscure contents”. $\endgroup$ Aug 11 at 2:05
  • $\begingroup$ @ZeroTheHero --Sure, but I was using the term in MW's secondary definition of it, as meaning simply "wording". $\endgroup$
    – Edouard
    Aug 11 at 2:15
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    $\begingroup$ I’m guessing that English isn’t your native language. (Not that there is anything wrong with that!) In my experience most native English speakers use “verbiage” derogatorily. If they mean “wording” they just say “wording”, because “verbiage” in that meaning is kind of pretentious. I would have used “text” (vs. “diagrams”). $\endgroup$
    – Ghoster
    Aug 11 at 4:27
  • $\begingroup$ No, English has been the native language of several generations of my ancestors, as well as myself. It has never occurred to me that "verbiage" might be derogatory: To me, it appears to be a noun without emotional content, like "average". I can't clearly recall having seen the noun "wording" anywhere except in the Merriam-Webster definition we'd briefly discussed, but, as it didn't appear senseless, it was probably from regions where Germanic and Romance languages interacted, as were my ancestors. Re downvoting, it would've been irresponsible in an unclear situation (inflation re BB). $\endgroup$
    – Edouard
    Aug 11 at 9:01

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If you need to edit a graphic in a post then what I suggest is you download the image to your PC, edit it as you see fit, then edit the post to include the new image.

However please do not do this to the answer you have found. There are two different definitions of the term Big Bang, both of which are in widespread use. See Is the Big Bang defined as before or after Inflation? for more on this. Anna's answer is using one definition while the video you have linked is using the other definition. Neither is wrong, so please do not edit Anna's answer.

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  • $\begingroup$ Rest assured, I won't. Rudiger Vaas's explanation of the multiple meanings of the phrase "Big Bang" has been very helpful, and effectively differentiates between some of its relativistic and quantum mechanical meanings. I'm aware that Anna works at CERN, whereas NASA works on a macroscalar basis: I just hadn't thought of the resultant ambiguities, and had, consequently, proceeded (unfortunately) on a "size matters" basis. $\endgroup$
    – Edouard
    Aug 9 at 16:48
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    $\begingroup$ @Edouard What do you mean by macroscalar? Also, Anna’s profile says that she is retired. $\endgroup$
    – Ghoster
    Aug 10 at 0:25
  • $\begingroup$ @Ghoster --I'm using "macroscalar" as meaning "large scale" (like JWST), as opposed to "small scale" (like atoms). I usually do check the profiles of participants before commenting on their remarks, but Anna has been such a helpful presence on the site that I neglected to do so. $\endgroup$
    – Edouard
    Aug 11 at 2:43

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