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I wanted to ask a question about how a room temperature changes in certain conditions, but before asking I wanted to be sure of some things:

  1. Is it on topic? I suppose so since the main point is temperature, but I want to be sure.
  2. What data should I provide in the question? I was thinking of: room size, shape, position of heater, position of door (and windows). Should I also include room position in the building? Other things?
  3. Anything I'm forgetting?
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Temperature and heat are fundamentally physics concepts. Oh, we let the chemists and engineer's play with our toys, but you are fine there...

The big restriction is tht we don't like to answer anything that looks like it might have been copied from a homework assignment or out of a introdutory physics text. We do want to talk about the basic concepts there, but we don't propose to work your exercise for you.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yes I know, but I'm fine in that case since I'm not a Physics/Chemistry/Maths/Science student. I study languages. :D It's just my own... interest. The room actually exists. :D $\endgroup$ – Alenanno Dec 19 '12 at 15:31
  • $\begingroup$ Well then, the trick is to not write like a textbook author... $\endgroup$ – dmckee Dec 19 '12 at 15:33
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    $\begingroup$ That's impossible, my style is unavoidably top-notch. :P lol ahah thanks for the help. :) $\endgroup$ – Alenanno Dec 19 '12 at 15:41
  • $\begingroup$ The Chemistry mod in me is angry :O $\endgroup$ – Manishearth Dec 19 '12 at 16:12
  • $\begingroup$ @Manishearth Does it help if I admit that many of the people involved in overthrowing the theory of caloric were chemists? $\endgroup$ – dmckee Dec 19 '12 at 16:18
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    $\begingroup$ @dmckee: Yep :) Psst. I'm a chemistry-basher myself if physics is on the other side . I hate chemistry as a classroom topic to be tested on (but I love reading up on it and teaching myself elsewhere). My favorite physics-is-better material: one of my friends' father(a physicist) said this to a chemist once (during a physics vs chem argument) Chemistry was created when they decided that physics got too big. Sooner or later, we'll decide that a few more topics--say, geometrical optics-- will be rather unnecessary and give them to chemistry. I cracked up at "geometrical optics" :P $\endgroup$ – Manishearth Dec 19 '12 at 16:35
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The trick is to ask about physics concepts. So set out the relevant concepts that you do understand, and then ask about one of the concepts that you don't understand.

What you shouldn't expect is a calculation unique to your room, because that would be too limited, too narrow in scope for our readership's interest (too localised, in the site parlance).

What you will get, all being well, is an explanation of how to use particular principles for you to do the calculation.

But given what you've written above, I think the two best answers to your question are going to be:

  • (best answer): do the experiment, and record the empirical data yourself

  • (second-best answer): model the room in a building physics simulation model such as EnergyPlus

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