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Everything is very conveniently hidden behind the Moderator Agreement. I Understand that there are Privacy Issues, especially In cases where there is use of abusive language.

While precise details of the Suspension need not be disclosed, I think even a line offering the basic reason is necessary so that the community can know exactly why, Such as "Use of abusive language" or "Intentional and repeated spamming" or "Unfounded Allegations against Moderators" or whatever the reason is.

There is another post Which asks for a lot more to be disclosed. But I only ask for a one line reason available to the Public, Especially if you are Imposing 6 Month - 1 Year suspensions to users who are otherwise friendly atleast to me.

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    $\begingroup$ There already is a one-line blurb. For example, "to cool down" usually is for rudeness, while "voting irregularities" is for sockpuppeteering. $\endgroup$ – Manishearth Sep 4 '13 at 15:36
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    $\begingroup$ Users are given the courtesy of not being publicly shamed by hiding most of the details. You could always ask the user why they were suspended. Don't expect a straight answer, though. $\endgroup$ – Robert Harvey Sep 4 '13 at 15:38
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    $\begingroup$ I don't want a pre-decided response. I want something more precise relevant to the case. I did change the title. $\endgroup$ – Prathyush Sep 4 '13 at 15:39
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    $\begingroup$ @Manishearth: "to cool down" doesn't tell you anything. Does it tell you that the user attacked another user? Used vulgarities? Spread false rumours? $\endgroup$ – Abhimanyu Pallavi Sudhir Sep 4 '13 at 17:08
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    $\begingroup$ @RobertHarvey: The point is that most users want the details to be revealed. I wanted the details to be revealed during my suspension! Many people who were suspended wanted this! I comnpletely agree with this meta - post. At least, the user should havwee an option to say that he wants the reasons to be public. $\endgroup$ – Abhimanyu Pallavi Sudhir Sep 4 '13 at 17:10
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    $\begingroup$ @DImension10AbhimanyuPS: You have the ability to tell your side of the story in your user profile, if you wish. $\endgroup$ – Robert Harvey Sep 4 '13 at 17:26
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    $\begingroup$ @DImension10AbhimanyuPS "Doesn't tell you anything" -- It tells you enough, IMO. As suspensions are supposed to be forgotten by the community (except for the purpose of escalation) after they pass, there really is no need in exposing this. "Most users want this" : Uh, no. Just because a couple of users wanted it doesn't mean most do. And they are free to do that on their profile or reveal it publicly elsewhere. $\endgroup$ – Manishearth Sep 4 '13 at 17:28
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    $\begingroup$ FWIW, if a user specifically requests us to make the reason for their suspension public, I think we are allowed to do so (not obliged, allowed). Not sure. But it needs to be clearly requested; just because the rest of the community wants to know doesn't mean we have to tell them. $\endgroup$ – Manishearth Sep 4 '13 at 17:30
  • $\begingroup$ @RobertHarvey: You cannot edit your user profile when suspended. $\endgroup$ – Abhimanyu Pallavi Sudhir Nov 10 '13 at 3:40
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We give the short indication on the profile to avoid the Streisand effect, so other users get a general idea of why an account was suspended. The user that was suspended is always welcome to contact us (the Stack Exchange team) to let us know if they feel the suspension was unwarranted or excessive. There are checks and balances on everything that community moderators can do.

Giving too much more detail would border on violating the user's privacy - remember that search engines see profile pages and that text, so less there is definitely better. The system provides enough so that those interested in recent events the user was involved in can probably determine what happened, and we're respectful of the user's privacy in the process.

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    $\begingroup$ The point is that most people want the reasons to be public! . $\endgroup$ – Abhimanyu Pallavi Sudhir Sep 4 '13 at 17:11
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    $\begingroup$ @DImension10AbhimanyuPS, no. The point is that "most people" don't have a right to the specific reasons. $\endgroup$ – Colin McFaul Sep 4 '13 at 17:30
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Treat this as a way of expression that I am unhappy with such long suspensions being imposed. Since I don't know why it happened, perhaps you have a reason and I won't pursue. It certainly involved people who I enjoyed listening to.

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    $\begingroup$ The escalation of suspensions is a standard part of the process. A one year suspension is what happens when a user who has already received a month long suspension resumes his or her old habits. In the case of Ron, we started him at one day instead of one week as is usual. Only then did he got on the usual schedule, so he's ahead of the game. $\endgroup$ – dmckee Sep 5 '13 at 2:52
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    $\begingroup$ "And I want to know it." Why? Again, privacy. Especially in the case of prominent users, where people are apt to visit their profile, keeping a more thorough explanation for the benefits of all the nosy folks around may just contribute to making the user an outcast when the suspension period gets over. However in the case of escalated one year suspensions, dmckee's comment applies. The harshness has nothing to do with the severity of the act, it has to do with the user's inability to learn from the previous suspension. $\endgroup$ – Manishearth Sep 5 '13 at 3:21
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    $\begingroup$ Basically, what constructive use can you make from this information? (again, if you really want to know, just contact the user) $\endgroup$ – Manishearth Sep 5 '13 at 3:24

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