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Well I can read the reason why my question was put on hold

" ask about a specific physics concept and show some effort"

However I wonder if that would be the good action for questions like these. I honestly did a lot already, however everything I always saw was just "beating around the point". And I knew I missed a simple fact from the text in the question.

A comment already gave the answer (as I showed), which was simply that if the thrust to weight is constant, the accelleration is also constant.
I did no realise this, and without this one can't beat the question. I started the question thus with "I have no idea how to start this...", simply because I saw that in whatever I would do I would miss a value - and any extra information would determine which method to use.

So this question could both be answered easily as well as helps understanding. I could point all things I did already, and then you would all look into a mistake in my calculations or something. But I knew that wasn't the problem (and thus a waste of everyone's time) and I knew the problem was misinterpreting the problem.

Is closing really good for actual questions about "understanding information given"?

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    $\begingroup$ Quoting the policy, It's not enough to just show your work and ask where you went wrong. If you just need someone to check your work, you can always seek out a friend, classmate, or teacher. As a rule of thumb, a good conceptual question should be useful even to someone who isn't looking at the problem you happen to be working on $\endgroup$ – Manishearth Jan 30 '14 at 13:56
  • $\begingroup$ Which quite frankly above question was, as the "answer" (in comment) shows that with a constant $\psi$ the acceleration is also constant. $\endgroup$ – paul23 Jan 30 '14 at 14:04
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The aim of this site is to become a resource of useful information for future students of Physics or indeed anyone wanting to learn more about Physics.

The problem with homework questions is that they are generally only of interest to one person i.e. the person doing the homework. So this type of question doesn't contribute anything useful to the site. That's why your question got closed.

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    $\begingroup$ This seems awfully lot like a generic reply to a "why is a homework question closed" topic. As I said, even the information that a constant thrust-to-weight relates to a constant acceleration is actually good to learn.... Quite frankly that is more informative than a lot of other topics I've seen. $\endgroup$ – paul23 Jan 31 '14 at 12:23
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    $\begingroup$ @paul23: a constant thrust-to-weight relates to a constant acceleration is Newton's second law. A question about Newton's laws might be of interest, though it's a bit elementary for this site. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Jan 31 '14 at 12:26
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    $\begingroup$ Once you realize that, it indeed is easy. And IF you know that this is the important step in a problem that would be easy... It is just that this isn't trivial when reading textual problems. I'm going to name and shame here, but physics.stackexchange.com/questions/95974/… Isn't that equally "trivial"? Or actually even more silly? Yet that is considered a good question? (heck once you define acceleration it is just mathematics) $\endgroup$ – paul23 Jan 31 '14 at 12:31
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    $\begingroup$ @paul23: And what point are you making? Are you claiming your question is of general interest? If so request a reopen and if five members of the site agree with you the question will be reopened. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Jan 31 '14 at 15:41
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    $\begingroup$ My point is that people should stop the "reflex" of seeing "homework" and thinking "hmm this should be closed". As I am working heavily to see how a "standard studybook" example is in any way more useful than an actual problem? I could rephrase the problem and then no one would guess it is "homework", but the way a question is phrased does not change the information so not the value. $\endgroup$ – paul23 Jan 31 '14 at 23:10
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    $\begingroup$ @paul23 I strongly disagree with your last statement. The way a question is phrased has a huge influence on how discoverable the information it contains is, and thence on the value of the question. As I see it, you do have a useful conceptual question buried in that post, and if you can dig it out of that context the post will be much more useful for future visitors and much more likely to be reopened. $\endgroup$ – Emilio Pisanty Feb 1 '14 at 16:44

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