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I've had two questions put on hold so far. One eventually got closed (for an arguably good reason), but the other one is still on hold. I've made edits to the question and left a comment pointing this out, but how do I know when my changes have been reviewed?

For that matter, since I obviously have difficulty wording my questions in such a way that accurately reflect the answer I'm trying to get, when I get a canned (copy/pasted from the help center) message that my question isn't about mainstream physics, but my intent was to learn the mainstream physics, how can I find out what exactly in my question lead to the conclusion that put it on hold in the first place?

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  • $\begingroup$ I don't know that there is a way for a low rep user to know that. Users with 10k can look in the review queue history. $\endgroup$ – dmckee Jun 28 '14 at 18:12
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One eventually got closed

Closed and on hold are the same state, except for the wording. On hold questions are automatically closed in 5 days (iirc). The wording change is to avoid people getting caught up in the finality of the term "closed".

when I get a canned (copy/pasted from the help center) message that my question isn't about mainstream physics

It isn't copy pasted. It's one of the options available to the close voters.

but how do I know when my changes have been reviewed?

Not directly through the system, but you can ask a mod in chat. In this case, the reopen review is here, a unanimous "Leave Closed"


how can I find out what exactly in my question lead to the conclusion that put it on hold in the first place?

Ask the commenters, or ask in chat. (Or on meta).

In this case, you were starting off with a "hypothetical" system forbidden by established physics (or, at least, hard to justify unless you specify the metric behind it). Idealized hypotheticals are okay, but ones which disobey physics are not.

Appending a non mainstream question with an EDIT block that asks a completely different question doesn't make sense either. Just ask a new question, though I suggest you clarify the paragraph at the end with what you mean when you talk of components. Preferably with a bit of mathematics

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  • $\begingroup$ As a programmer, when I want to debug a problem I reduce it to the simplest state that still shows the behavior I'm trying to analyze, removing anything that could distract from the core issue I'm attempting to tackle. I was trying to do the same thing with my question, but I guess that doesn't work as well with physics where it's difficult for a layman without specific experience in the field in question to tell what is or is not related to an issue at hand. I don't know whether I'm more annoyed at my lack of knowledge or at the fact that I tend to ask my questions sideways. $\endgroup$ – Freudian Slip Jun 28 '14 at 18:37
  • $\begingroup$ on the other hand, I still don't know why everybody thought I was talking about time dilation without spacial dilation, my very first point was that they needed to occur together. $\endgroup$ – Freudian Slip Jun 28 '14 at 18:44
  • $\begingroup$ @FreudianSlip (2 comments up) just speaking in general, removing unnecessary complication is a good idea, but you have to do it in a way that doesn't invalidate the same laws of physics you're asking about. $\endgroup$ – David Z Jun 28 '14 at 19:19
  • $\begingroup$ @DavidZ: The tough part is I didn't realize I was invalidating the physics. That, and I think I ended up adding more complexity to my question by trying to deconstruct it than if I had just asked the question I had outright. I (just now) rewrote my question in an attempt to undo the damage of my original thought experiment, but at this point I don't know if people are going to consider it as asking a completely different question and I'll maybe get dinged for that as well. It's frustrating when you don't how to ask a question in a way everybody expects. $\endgroup$ – Freudian Slip Jun 28 '14 at 19:37

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