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i did'nt asked any homework question

instead i asked the validity of a given formula

see this question

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    $\begingroup$ Did you click on and read the links in the close-reason? (particularly this one) Your question does qualify as homework-like. $\endgroup$ – Wouter Jul 27 '14 at 9:42
  • $\begingroup$ @Wouter yes i have read that and i just asked the validity of that formula as it contains trignometric terms which are dimension less and i dont know any other way to prove that $\endgroup$ – agha rehan abbas Jul 27 '14 at 9:50
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    $\begingroup$ Do you really not see how your question is homework-like? From that link: "A "homework question" is any question whose value lies in helping you understand the method by which the question can be solved, rather than getting the answer itself." Surely your question asks exactly that: how do I solve/prove this? So we've established that it falls under the homework-category, right? Now how do you get the question reopened? By showing what you have done to try and get the answer: links to websites you've visited (with some explanation of what's on there) and of course your own work. $\endgroup$ – Wouter Jul 27 '14 at 10:28
  • $\begingroup$ thanks i will keep that in mind $\endgroup$ – agha rehan abbas Jul 27 '14 at 10:30
  • $\begingroup$ @Wouter You should post that as an answer! $\endgroup$ – Bernhard Jul 27 '14 at 11:30
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    $\begingroup$ @Bernhard I was wondering if I shouldn't do so when I'd just written it, so now I have :) $\endgroup$ – Wouter Jul 27 '14 at 12:39
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Adapted from my comments.

From one of the links in the homework close reason:

A "homework question" is any question whose value lies in helping you understand the method by which the question can be solved, rather than getting the answer itself.

Surely your question asks exactly that: how do I solve/prove this? So we've established that it falls under the homework-category, right? Now how do you get the question reopened? By showing what you have done to try and get the answer: links to websites you've visited (with some explanation of what's on there) and of course your own work.

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  • $\begingroup$ can you see this question now physics.stackexchange.com/q/128223 $\endgroup$ – agha rehan abbas Jul 28 '14 at 7:21
  • $\begingroup$ @agharehanabbas I think you should ask a new meta question for that one. Personally, I think despite the effort you've shown there, the two main reasons for closing the question were (1) that you don't seem to have studied any classical mechanics and should probably do that first instead of asking here (for your own benefit) and (2) that it doesn't really ask about a physical concept. You state you want the concept you're missing, but then the answer is simply: "classical mechanics". From the close reason: "We want our questions to be useful to the broader community, and to future users." $\endgroup$ – Wouter Jul 28 '14 at 8:55
  • $\begingroup$ i have open one meta question for that but i want to emphasise that i asked the mathematical concept behind it $\endgroup$ – agha rehan abbas Jul 28 '14 at 12:10
  • $\begingroup$ sorry for that but i think i asked a mathematical concept for that to come to a conclusion that on which step will the body fall at last $\endgroup$ – agha rehan abbas Jul 28 '14 at 12:16

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