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I did a search and came up empty on how to use mathjax on this site. Do I need to use a third party or is a math symbols program built into the physics site?

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    $\begingroup$ physics.stackexchange.com/help/notation $\endgroup$ – David Z Mar 25 '17 at 4:42
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    $\begingroup$ And there is an excellent quick guide in MathJax basic tutorial and quick reference. $\endgroup$ – John Rennie Mar 25 '17 at 5:59
  • $\begingroup$ Related, if not a dupe: physics.meta.stackexchange.com/q/804, physics.meta.stackexchange.com/q/9133 (and the multitude of links therein). $\endgroup$ – Kyle Kanos Mar 25 '17 at 17:49
  • $\begingroup$ This is just to remind you that you can, if you see a block of math on a page, that might be useful to you later, right click on the block and a rectangle will appear around it. If you then left click you should see a range of display options, view as mathjax is one of them, clicking on that will open a new tab and you can copy and paste the output and save it to a text file on your pc. I might have mixed up left/right clicks, but try it and remember to reinsert the $ signs. $\endgroup$ – user146020 Mar 26 '17 at 8:50
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This site has MathJax enabled, which means that you can essentially use any (reasonable) LaTeX command inside dollar and double-dollar signs (or indeed inside equation or align environments, among others), and it will display as mathematics; thus

$$f(x)=x^2$$

will display as

$$f(x)=x^2.$$

For help in getting started with LaTeX as a way to typeset mathematics, the best place is probably the tutorial MathJax basic tutorial and quick reference on the Mathematics Stack Exchange meta.

You should not need any external tools to either view or write MathJax-powered mathematics on this site. If for some reason you don't see the mathematics displaying, you can ask here on meta but be sure to provide as many details about your browser configuration as possible.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks Emilio, my reply should have been s comment, I think. $\endgroup$ – user146020 Mar 26 '17 at 8:51

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