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At electronics.SE we received this question: Representing charges in computer programming

The gist of the question comes from this paragraph:

How can electric charges be represented in terms of programming? Do you have to simulate each and every ion or are there overall principles so you can calculate with "whole" charges? I could imagine Circuit simulations already implement some calculations with electrodynamics.

Does this community think it might fit in here?

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I don't know much of anything about neuroelectrodynamics specifically, so I can't say for sure, but personally, my first impression is that it would not fit particularly well here. The question seems to be about representing a system in software, which is really more of a programming issue than a physics issue. There's a chance it would fit on the beta scientific computation site, or perhaps on Stack Overflow.

But I would suggest waiting a little while to see if someone with more knowledge in the field chimes in.

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I feel it can fit here because there is some physics involved. Most people who run simulations in the bio-physics area use coarse grained models where a complex molecule such as RNA is divided into coarser sub-units based on physical principles. A full molecular dynamics simulation is extremely intensive to perform. The physics comes in when you decide how to coarse grain your model? I am not an expert in the field, but from what little I know, the objective usually is to predict conformational changes or time evolution of structural features. They discuss this as a classical mechanics problem.

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