Hot answers tagged

24

Thanks a lot for your warm and kind words, colleagues and e-pals. I hope that there will also be contributions in the future and many people will also be made happy and fewer people will be provoked by my (and other) answers! And congratulations to quantum mechanics for having earned the gold badge – this sometimes underappreciated princess of the 20th ...


9

They are reversed, just after a period of maximum 24 hours. The serial upvoting detection script is a heavy one and is run daily. If you find such a case that is not reversed, let the moderators know in a custom flag.


8

solar-wind has 80 questions, and tag badges are only awarded for tags which are used on 100 or more questions. Consequently, you also can't track a tag badge for solar-wind in your profile.


8

There are already Nice/Good/Great Answer badges, given at 10, 25 and 100 votes respectively, which can be earned multiple times on multiple questions. Users with multiple such badges can be trusted to be "consistently good answerers" and have already been rewarded as such. There are also tag badges, which are relatively rare and which are awarded at 100/400/...


7

Head to https://physics.stackexchange.com/reputation for your reputation stats. Near the bottom you'll see something like: days represented 197 rep cap was reached via rep from upvotes only on 3 days earned at least 200 reputation on 4 days earned 250 reputation from suggested edits It's not clear to me if the "upvotes only" number is used or if ...


7

Well, that's why you only get 40 per day - before that restriction was put in place, folks were abusing it. Occasionally, we do encounter someone doing something crazy with their 40/day, but generally-speaking votes are the voter's to do with as he wishes - even if that means squandering them.


7

I think that your point, that users with more rep points can throw around bad answers without much repercussions, while newer users get smashed is wrong on both counts. As an 'established user', posting an egregiously wrong answer and getting called out on it is a lot more visible, and a lot more embarrassing, than for new users. Further, people will be ...


7

If you click on the bronze bar, it shows that having a positive question record is the requirement you need to fulfull. A full description of the requirements for the badge is available on Meta Stack Exchange. It includes the requirement for a positive question record: A positive question record means you don't have too many closed, downvoted or ...


7

There seems to be two ideas behind the badges -- introduce people to concepts/tools/features of the site, and encourage people to do things that are needed but may be tedious. The Critic badge you refer to is the former, while badges encouraging X number of edits is the latter. Downvotes are essential for the health of the website. It is how we distinguish ...


6

Try https://physics.stackexchange.com/help/badges?tab=tags&filter=bronze You can reach it through the menus by: Go to your user page. Click on "badges" in the horizontal menu. Select any badge you have earned. Click on "Badges" in the box in the upper right. For the non-tag badges, it will then tell you how many of each one has been awarded on the ...


5

Click on the "share" button below a question or an answer: This will bring up the standard share buttons for Google Plus, Facebook and Twitter, which will place a link to the post on your Plus page / timeline / feed. You will also be able to copy a link to the question that identifies you as the person who shared it; these look like this: http://...


5

The way to parse the condition is Highest scoring answer that outscored (an accepted answer with score of more than 10) by more than 2x. This means that the conditions for an answer of score a to be awarded the populist badge is for there to be an accepted answer of score A, where a > 2 A, A > 10, and there are no other answers with score > a. In turn,...


4

The requirements for that badge are five well-received questions, and a positive question record. You've fulfilled the first requirement, but not the second. You seem to be pretty close to even, so it shouldn't take many more well-received questions to fulfill that requirement, as long as you can avoid poorly-received questions.


4

You'll get the badge if and only if the edit gets approved by the reviewers in the Suggested Edits queue. In your particular case, the edit is approved, and you have accordingly received the badge. For more information, see What kind of edits contribute to the editor badges?.


4

Exact requirements are listed on Meta Stack Overflow: Beta silver; awarded once Participate actively in a site's private beta phase Not just 3 bronze badges anymore, but the exact requirements not disclosed to prevent users from just doing the bare minimum. Not awarded on Meta sites, including Meta Stack Overflow Source: Jeff's ...


4

I only just realized this, but if you hover over the progress badge of a review task, a "badge progress" pop-up appears:


4

Here you go. Enter your user ID and run the query, it will list all your comments, beginning with the highest voted, so you can easily count how many you have over 5 votes.


4

Good question. The initial idea for the badges was simply to give them based on number of questions asked. For most sites, that would probably have been a fine choice. But a few sites (notably our flagship, Stack Overflow) get more questions than they can reasonably handle each day. The "on separate days" requirement exists to encourage pacing oneself and ...


4

It shouldn't matter how much reputation you have, you should always prevent answers which are downvoted. Since we are not dealing with opinion based questions, downvotes are given for bad answers. (Of course, sometimes there are those unjustified downvotes, but I guess (I hope), it happens rarely.) So what would prevent you from giving bad answers? A higher ...


3

The one-stop shop for tracking your badge progress (not that you should really be doing that) is this answer to Badge Progress Reports on the mother meta. There are usually a few relevant queries in the Stack Exchange Data Explorer to choose from. In this particular case, I can't find one that looks reliable; the mother meta thread points to the reputation ...


3

A badge is a reward for taking the time and effort to make the site better. Removing a downvote does not negate the effort you've put in, so you still deserve the badge.


3

You can find the full badge description here You need to use the "share" link and share the question with others (Sharing it on an SE site will not work). This is usually done via Twitter/Facebook/etc. If enough people click on it, you get a badge.


3

Using your notation, the requirements for the populist badge are a > 2 * A A > 10 Not as you have it. So if A <= 10, the badge cannot be awarded. At bare minimum a would need to have 23 upvotes to A having 11. does that imply that when the badge was awarded A was < 17? From the timeline page, it seems Jamal's post was upvoted 25 times to ooker's ...


2

The next badge info is indeed buggy. My display tells me my next badge is the [black-holes] badge but I earned that four days ago. I would guess that tpg2114 is correct and the data is only updated intermittently. I note there are similar questions on the main Meta, for example: User profile Badge progress bar shows a completed bar, not the next one to get. ...


2

Editing without having the edit reviewed is a privilege earned with 2000 reputation. But you can always suggest an edit, regardless of how much reputation you have. (Even without being logged in!) When you suggest an edit, if you don't have 2000 rep, your edit suggestion is placed in a queue to be reviewed by high-reputation users, and if they approve it, ...


1

As you've noticed, badges are separate for the main and meta sites. Some badges just can't be obtained on meta (even though they appear in the list of badges), and the chat badges (Talkative and Outspoken) are part of those. The chat server is shared with all other Stack Exchange sites (except Stack Overflow and Meta Stack Exchange which have their own ...


1

Participating in the SE has to be fun otherwise people won't do it, and earning badges is part of the fun. As the recipient of a few Enlightened badges they have always felt like a thank you from the SE for the effort I put in, and actually I like that - it's always nice to feel appreciated. I don't think the Enlightened badge is intended to stimulate ...


1

A "zero score accepted" answer is one the OP has awarded the green checkmark but has a net of zero votes. The thresholds are somewhat arbitrary, but they are designed to reward people who have a lot of such answers by comparison to their total pool of answers. They mean that you have to have at least [5|10] such answers and those totals have to be at least ...


1

We cache these at a few levels in some cases for up to 3 days, this is normal and expected. We may optimize how flair works a bit later as some of the avatar discussions progress internally, we'll update meta.so with that if it any changes are made to improve user flair overall.


1

This time it's caching on your side. Your computer has saved a copy of the image locally so it doesn't have to download it again and again, it may download it only once a day or so. On my side I see: So, most others can see 50 in your badge count, and it'll probably update for you sooner or later.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible