13

Questions about perpetual-motion machines should meet a stricter-than-usual bar in terms of clarity and prior research to get on HNQ. Questions about perpetual-motion seem to have a particularly easy time hitching a ride on the HNQ list (this is one recent example), and it's easy to see why: they are instantly appealing to a lot of people, they are ...


11

Here's my go: Homework-like questions and check-my-work questions are considered off-topic here, particularly when they are about specific computations instead of asking about the conceptual frameworks that underlie the calculations. Homework questions can be on-topic when they are useful to a broader audience, but please read the links above carefully ...


9

This question is based on a bit of a false premise. Errata related to the concepts seems to be accepted as on-topic. See here. The difference in this post is that you're not asking about a concept, you're asking about "what's happening" with the lack of mention of "$^{(4)} R$ in Box 8.4 (pg 202)". It's not clear what conceptual difficulty you're having....


8

JMac has done an excellent job at addressing your specific question that was closed. I want to address my issues with this part: Now, I think physics.stackexchange should be broader in their mindset. The goal should be to promote physics learning overall. This is a very subjective goal. What is "physics learning overall"? Each user will have their own ...


6

OK, I'll start. Questions about physics in works of fiction shouldn't be on HNQ. This has been a point of contention for quite some time, and it has a strong track record of leaving people confused and upset, even several years after the question has had its heyday (example, example, example). I'm referring, in particular, to questions like "Could Sam have ...


4

This is based on a canned comment frequently posted by ACuriousMind, but with an additional sentence to remind readers that answering homework-like questions may also be a poor use of everyone's time. Please note that homework-like questions and check-my-work questions are generally considered off-topic here. We intend our questions to be potentially ...


3

I would also like to eliminate the word “homework” from the name of the policy as it creates an unnecessary emphasis on how you came to the question rather than the intrinsics of the question. I also think that you should give some understanding of why in this sort of policy. Here is a 486-character rephrasing that illustrates what I would find preferable: ...


3

Let's talk specifics. And by that, I mean, "let me be the first to shoot my own self-interest in the foot", and argue that this question, which I answered, was rightly kicked off the HNQ list. What's the deal? Well, the question starts off with the title Is the Born rule indeed wrong? and it is basically a request to verify the correctness of an ...


3

Of course it would be technically possible to make the bumping algorithm more complicated in a way that prevents it from bumping certain posts. But there is a much simpler way: upvote an answer to the post. Or if none of the existing answers is worthy of an upvote, post your own that is. (Or if the question should be closed, vote to close it and use the ...


1

Homework-like questions and check-my-work questions are generally considered off-topic here, particularly when they are about specific computations instead of concepts that underlie calculations. Homework questions can be on-topic when they are useful to a broader audience, but please read the links above carefully before editing. Characters: 439/500 It's ...


1

This initiative appears to have petered out, but this question is an excellent example of a bad HNQ question, for a wide variety of reasons. The question was characterized, in answers, comments, and chat, as a "John Rennie vs. safesphere" wrestling match, or even a battle of relativity vs. crackpots, when it was really about a much more boring ...


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