Hot answers tagged

14

No. A non-peer reviewed reference is better than no reference. The reader can judge the legitimacy of a reference him/herself. In general, Phys.SE encourages answerers to back up claims with references. (Concerning self-citations, see this meta post. For link-only answers, see this meta post.)


14

There are multiple reasons why it's better to link to abstract pages rather than directly to the PDF versions: Mobile users and users with slow internet connection prefer an abstract page over a PDF file. (Also, downloading PDFs can redirect to other applications instead of staying in-browser; this should be an explicit choice on the part of the reader.) ...


11

Treating Wikipedia as authoritative (i.e. "Wikipedia say X and that settles it!") would be laughably silly, but Wikipedia is a fairly reliable source for all kinds of basic and widely available knowledge. Several uses of Wikkipedia that are (in my opinion, with my moderators hat taken off) completely appropriate: To support a argument or derivation only ...


10

No-one here is paid to answer your questions. In fact no-one here receives any reward for answering your questions other than the feeling of satisfaction that we've left the world of physics a slightly better place than we've found it. So if you expect to attract good answers to your questions you're going to have to convince the site members that taking ...


10

So I've read his answer many times now and I don't see how you reach the conclusion you reached here. It says: Posting links in comments is not banned, nor should it ever be banned. What should be banned is the repeated posting of a link to an alternative physics Q&A site (such as PO, PF, Quora, etc)1. It is the repetitive nature of the act that ...


9

The Physics SE is a community, and like all communities it needs everyone to pull together to keep it vibrant. The two most important things we expect of site members are: ask interesting and informed questions provide interesting and informed answers There are of course other supporting activities like processing the review queues, up and downvoting, ...


9

Good points, and I agree that these questions need some particular handling. My general rule for linked resources is this: judge the question as if the links weren't there, at least for purposes of deciding whether to downvote or vote to close it. Specifically, don't click on the link to the video and see whether the question still makes sense. In some cases ...


8

Firstly, note that very few sites offer both HTTP and HTTPS. There's only one that I can think of -- Wikipedia. GMail used to; but we don't link to GMail on Phys.SE and it's pure HTTPS now anyway. What is HTTPS, and how does it work? See this post if you're interested to know more. Or, y'know, Google it. It is simply a protocol that prevents snooping and ...


7

Is it not acceptable to post links in comments? Or is it not acceptable to post links to the same site in comments? Posting links in comments is not banned, nor should it ever be banned. What should be banned is the repeated posting of a link to an alternative physics Q&A site (such as PO, PF, Quora, etc)1. It is the repetitive nature of the act that ...


7

There was a comment on the first question, now deleted, which linked to the second question. That's why those questions were added to each others' Linked sidebars in the first place. As for why the links are still there, I can only imagine that the list of linked questions is cached, and the cache has not been updated in the past few days since the comment ...


7

In general, we expect posts to be self contained so that all details needed are provided & users do not have to go off-site to find out what you're really questioning. Hence, you should provide a link for additional reference to the post, but it should not be a requirement to understand what it is you are looking at and/or questioning. Ben's comment ...


6

As a general rule, if a comment contains a link to information that is directly pertinent to the OP's question, and to any future visitors interested in the post, I do not think it should be deleted. I do not think that repeated postings of such comments should be cause for concern, with the strong proviso that each and every comment must link to content ...


6

If the answer really is just a link: no, you shouldn't accept it. Answers are supposed to be self-contained, in that the content of the answer itself should be enough to answer the question without making you follow any links. (No matter how good the solution presented in the link, it is still behind a link, and is not part of the answer.) If you see a link-...


6

As explained at the bottom of the formatting help page you use [link text](url). There is also a more detailed help page just for comment formatting.


6

I certainly don't see anything wrong with links per se or repeatedly posting links to helpful webpages (e.g. wiki). I doubt that there's a blacklist of forbidden links, but you should not post links to offensive/inappropriate material or even irrelevant material. The aspect of your question regarding links to sites in which you hold a vested interest is ...


6

When you're answering a question about an observation like settling in fluid there are two parts to the answer. One is an explanation of the mathematical model used, and the second is the estimation of numerical values for constants used in your calculation. The mathetical model rarely needs citations, except possibly you're using a citation to skip the ...


6

Questions and answers are followed by several links, one of which is "share." Clicking "share" opens a little modal window with the permalink in a text box and a button that lets you copy it to your clipboard. But you can also right-click (or long-tap) the "share" link and copy it to the clipboard using the context menu in your browser, same as other links. ...


5

Educated guess: I think the answer here is that the current Astronomy.SE is the second iteration of that site. The first iteration failed at some stage in the Area51 process and Physics absorbed many of their questions. Later, apparently, a second Astronomy site was begun. I suppose it's possible that some post IDs got re-used. Note that the correct link, ...


5

Adding 4 spaces to the beginning of a line makes it a code block. Click 'edit' to see the four spaces before this line. It is useful on the programming sites (e.g., StackOverflow) where there is syntax highlighting enabled on those (something we don't have/need here). I've deleted those 4 spaces & the picture now appears.


4

A question link is converted to its question title in questions & answers but not in comments. (In chat it is possible to one-box a question link.)


4

Using my moderator superpowers I have removed the trailing slashes. There also seemed to be some invisible characters there. In any case, both links seem to work now.


4

As I have expressed mainly by my edits on such posts, video-based questions can indeed be rescued to give, I think, fairly high-quality content. This is definitely time-consuming and should only be done if you think the end product will be worth it, but I think the end results can be quite good, such as these two, in their before-and-after shots: Rotor ...


4

Since all TP.SE threads were migrated to Phys.SE, it is in principle possible to fix the link, which is hereby done.


3

This is probably a useless plug since most of Physics.SE's users do not come from China, but in China the government packet-filters all unencrypted overseas links, doing slow string-searching on them for keywords and RSTing the connection when sensitive stuff is detected. Obviously this big string-searching is the huge bottleneck on all the Chinese network ...


3

Besides the points made in the answers by David Z & Emilio Pisanty, make sure to mention in the question lecturer, title, etc, of video, so the link can be recreated in case of link rot. minute in video, so the reader doesn't have to watch the entire video.


3

So, my question is, should I go through the linked list and edit them so the links aren't explicit? It seems like it would be a good thing to do, but I want to make sure. Just to be clear, the change we're talking about is changing en.m.wikipedia.org to en.wikipedia.org, and similarly for other mobile-optimized URLs. That's a fine change to make but it ...


3

Will I get a whole load of moderators moaning at me? Yes. Not just moderators, but the whole spectrum of site members (as Kyle Kanos mentioned in a comment). And it's not just moaning; questions which include pictures of something that could be typed out attract downvotes and close votes. They look unprofessional, and (as Qmechanic mentioned in a comment) ...


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