Hot answers tagged

29

YES Physics.SE should undergo a 30 day test with 3 votes required to close and reopen questions.


17

I agree and would vote to reopen if the closing vote weren't a mod. Reasons: One does not know before asking the question what the answer is going to look like. Once you've seen the answer then one could say it's a meteorological phenomenon and not a physics one, but a priori it could equally be an optics question. Meteorology is intimately related to ...


12

First, note that not all homework related questions are off topic here. However... I wasn't interested in learning or understanding any physics methods; my interest was to find out whether 13 is indeed the answer for the problem in question. It's the Devil's dozen that made me interested. For me, the value of the posted solutions is that they prove that 13 ...


12

Your question does not ask a conceptual question about physics, it simply asks users to solve the exercise you call "the Devil's problem". That you ask us to solve the exercise not by saying "Solve this for me" but by asking whether a given number is the answer doesn't change anything in my eyes - how is an answer supposed to make the ...


10

The close reason on the question directs to the help center. The first bullet point in the on-topic section reads: Explanations of observed physical or astronomical phenomena Perhaps there is confusion since the question is asking "what is this" rather than "why is this". Unfortunately, to effectively do research for "why", ...


9

Even though you have eliminated an explicit reference to opinion, this does not change the fact that IMO the question is still opinion-based. I can answer yes/no/I think so/I don’t think so without reference to any physical law or principle, and my answer would be just as good as anybody else’s.


9

Based on some of the comments (now deleted), it looks like the first user who voted to close did so because they were focusing on how the OP was trying to apply scaling space to Newton's second law. Perhaps the first user figured that the OP was talking about their own theory of scaling space then? Although in my (speculative) opinion, this user seemed upset ...


8

I do agree that it's not really a duplicate; but it should remain closed. For one thing, it's hard to understand the question behind the huge rant. Your rant seems to entirely focus on how unclear some people are when they discuss the "number of atoms in the universe". From what I've understood, you seem to have an issue with how some people choose to ...


8

I did imply in my question that I wanted to see a solution, but that was merely because I wanted to verify. I wanted to get convinced whether 13 is the answer. We call these check-my-work questions. Yours is exceptionally interesting, and perhaps the community will vote to reopen it on that merit. But generally check-my-work questions are not high-quality, ...


7

I have a degree of sympathy for your position, and had I seen the question before it was closed I would have posted an answer. But my answer would be that you have misunderstood what we mean by the term photon. Have a look at my answer to Do photons truly exist in a physical sense or are they just a useful concept like $i = \sqrt{-1}$? Photons are only a ...


7

I agree that it's not really a homework question, though pasting a screenshot of the problem they're working on certainly looks like our everyday HW problem, but as you stated, Possibly it could be closed as being unclear, because the problem itself is not sufficiently defined. But this can be easily rectified. OP requested an explanation but didn't ...


7

This should be an easy answer. Yes. We should trial this. Stack Overflow tried it and were really happy with the results. And that's just what it is, a "trial". Rather than speculating on what the ups or downs of this could be, we have the opportunity to experimentally determine the true situation. If it doesn't work well, we don't adopt it permanently. If ...


7

As the banner at the top says, that question was closed because a similar question, Is spacetime absolute?, was already asked and already had satisfactory answers. Note that our community is based on asking questions and getting answers, not on having discussions. If you post exactly the same question again, the community will probably vote to close it as ...


6

While I can't speak for DavidZ, I will say that I voted to close due to "primarily opinion based". DavidZ picked the engineering reason, so his vote reason is what is shown (to users with high enough reputation). The reason I chose to close as such is because answers to questions like these usually involve much speculation. Usually the OP either doesn't, ...


6

I voted to reopen, and am pleased to see that an interesting answer has now been given to an interesting physics question. I don't see any argument that this was not a physics question or that it was not on topic. Moderator privileges are intended to shortcut the process of voting if there are clear cut reasons why that should be done. They should not be ...


5

If you were just looking for someone to confirm that the answer to the problem was 13 without showing any work, I don't see how that would make the question a better fit for the site. To me, that would be off topic as a "check my work" type question, and a particularly bad one because no work was shown. An answer of "yes" would not be ...


5

I am the OP in question and I feel like I should post some clarifications, since some people seem to be jumping to even further conclusions than I did in the post. I don't think there is anything non-mainstream about my question, it was mostly a question about sloppy maths and I was well aware that I was in the wrong when I posted it but couldn't see why ...


5

I think the reason is that it starts to have too many answers which I didn't expect. This isn't quite right. We decide whether to close a question on the merits of the question, not the answers. The problem with a question of the form What are examples of X? is that there are many possible answers, and so it naturally attracts many partial answers, instead ...


5

I am one of the users who voted to close the question for the reason given in the close banner: This question appears to be about engineering, which is the application of scientific knowledge to construct a solution to solve a specific problem. As such, it is off topic for this site, which deals with the science, whether theoretical or experimental, of ...


5

I'm going to say no, it should not be reopened, at least not in its current form, though of course I voted to close it in the first place so that's not saying much new :-p The reason I voted to close it is basically that your question is just asking how some fairly arbitrary thing happened. We get quite a few questions that, like yours, tell us about ...


5

Honestly: your question is not very good for the site. Ignoring losses, does that mean a AA battery could theoretically lift 10,620.9 pounds, 1 foot high? YES. But of course, that’s not a very enlightening answer. The next paragraph talks about efficiencies, but it’s not possible to answer “what’s the best efficiency you can hope for” as this would ...


5

Yes. As stated here, both reopen and close votes expire after a certain period of time: For a question with less than 100 views, they expire one per day after 14 days. Otherwise they expire once per day, starting 4 days after the last vote was cast.


5

It's possible to post comments on the closed question Do absolute space and time exist? but you don't have the 50 reputation points required to comment everywhere (although you can comment on your own answers or questions, or any answers to your own questions). Stack Exchange sites are not discussion forums, and the Q&A (question & answer) pages ...


5

I voted to close the question for the reason that it belongs on Mathematics SE. The main closure reason was the homework reason, which I do disagree with. I think this question aligns more with the "needs detail and clarity" reason. To address some misconceptions: however I do think that what the actual substance of the question is actually high ...


4

There is a lot of tension between the kinds of questions our high-rep, long-time users like to see versus the kinds of questions that the automated processes tend to promote. There have been many Meta discussions about this tension, but in general the robots are here to help the people, rather than the other way around. When the Twitter robots and HNQ pick ...


4

With due respect, I think you're missing the larger point here. This question may or may not be a homework-style question to you, but it is definitely a homework-style question for the site. In other words, what matters is the value of the question to the site rather than to the OP. Don't get me wrong: this is a cute problem. I'm likely to use it as an ...


4

I will say that I don't think your fictional scenario itself is sufficient for closure, but I do think in this specific instance there is still some troubles with it. The other meta post you link to seems more concerned with actual published works of fiction that still has well defined rules and things that happened that other people can go look at. The ...


3

Your question was reviewed for reopening, and the reviewers unanimously voted to leave it on hold. Strictly speaking, that's why it wasn't reopened. Now, to give a bit more detail, when I look at your question I basically see this structure: [a homework problem] I'm confused that internal forces changes kinetic energy with respect to center of mass frame ...


3

1) Is this derivation correct? Check-my-work questions are generally off-topic here. 2) Does this form have some physical interpretation? This is a fairly broad question. What type of physical interpretation are you looking for? Additionally this is somewhat opinion based, as different people will have different ideas as to what constitutes a "physical ...


3

It totally deserved to be closed. Indications are that the OP wanted something short and quick, possibly because of some deadline on a test or an exam. Moreover there is no way to answer this question using physics principles, so it is better suited to MathSE than PSE.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible