26

See my answer here for the rationale behind this policy Note that this will require some community members to commit to curating the resource recommendations by flagging for post notice addition, flagging+commenting on bad answers, etc. This can't go through unless we get enough people who are willing to patrol for resource recommendation questions and ...


12

Yeah, I think that makes sense. The question in its current form seems like just the kind of thing the new recommendation policy is designed to encourage, and we should definitely have one open question about intro QM books. (Of course we also have to make sure the answers are in shape, but that can happen whenever.) Since this is an active meta discussion ...


12

Yes, this would be a very good fit for our resource-recommendations tag... if this question didn't already exist: What are good books for graduates/undergraduates in Astrophysics? That question is very general, so you can browse through the list of resources recommended there and pick out the ones that are at an appropriate level. Thus I don't see a need ...


9

Resource recommendation questions should be on-topic, but community wiki (and with the same expectation for the content of the answers as currently set in the faq post). The faq post should be altered to reflect that both old and new resource-recommendation questions should be turned into community wiki posts, as indicated in the top-voted answer of "Good ...


9

Yeah, this looks terrible. Not only does it waste the preview, it gets in the way of the question, and can easily end up being longer than the question itself. Fortunately, we have a system for attaching permanent banners to posts that doesn't get in the way of viewing the question. I've added one for book recommendations based on your template; if you see ...


9

Try StackEdit, or PageDown. The latter is the open source engine that SE uses, the former is an editor based on SE's flavor of markdown.


8

See also: Why are "shopping list" questions bad?, http://blog.stackoverflow.com/2011/08/the-future-of-community-wiki/ TL;DR I do feel that our book/list policy can be revised. Not removed, but loosened up considerably. For book questions, this can be done by making sure that answers include a sketch of the book -- what prerequisites are assumed, ...


8

Yes, this is perfectly acceptable. Of course, you should make sure that you follow the guidelines given in Are resource recommendations allowed?. To maximize the chances of success of your question: provide a description of the concepts that you're interested in with as much detail as you can provide a clear picture of what you do and don't understand, so ...


7

Actually, the book question should be kept and any question on resource recommendations should be automatically linked to it. It is an extremely useful question as it allows for a person to find books on any topic.


7

Since my comment may have been part of sparking this I should probably say a few more words. I am sympathetic to the position that carefully limited, actively curated, reasonably objective list questions can be a good thing (tm) for the site. I really am. But I don't believe that those conditions can be reliably met and I know from bitter experience that ...


7

I have a lot of sympathy for this suggestion because we all have collections of links to useful books and articles (many of mine are links to questions on the Physics Stack Exchange). But the problem is that bitter experience suggests that managing collections of links never works. Links go stale and after the initial burst of enthusiasm no-one keeps the ...


6

I can give you a partial answer: if they are on topic, these questions should be tagged as specific-reference. The difference is that resource-recommendations questions ask for a general class of resources related to a certain topic, where the set of resources that constitute valid answers is large and probably grows over time; on the other hand, specific-...


5

I propose that we edit the resource recommendation banner into these questions, making the questions follow the policy. As for the answers, those which do not follow the policy can be collected into a single Community Wiki answer. Maybe with a disclaimer about how it is no longer considered a good answer to a recommendation question. We could alternatively ...


5

You are confusing a specific topic with a specific reference. Your question is about a very specific topic, but it asks for any reference that covers the topic in detail, i.e. any book, any paper, etc. The list of possible answers is not closed, so it should be tagged as a resource-recommendation question.


5

No. Resource recommendation questions are for resource recommendations.


5

If the tag is inappropriate, it should be removed. If the post has already been made community wiki, you can flag it for moderator attention.


4

My take on this, and I'll expand it some more when I think about it more, is that there is a very clear good list/bad list distinction. But most of the questions people argue are good lists, I don't agree are. Here's what makes a bad list: A single answer is unlikely to be complete on its own. The question you cited that prompted this post also falls on ...


4

Yes, I will try to help; based on my own state of knowledge though.


4

I vote the historical lock. I don't think the question has any real value, but some future non-physicist people might find it useful. Update (sorry for delay, had things to do) AFAICR, the new resource recommendation policy clearly states that Resource recommendations must ask for descriptive answers. It's not enough to ask for a list of books that cover ...


4

In short, the reason is that resource recommendation questions aren't allowed to only ask about books. If you look in the body of the second question, it actually asks for "introductory guides". Yes, the title does say "books", and we should probably change that, but it should be understood as asking for any educational resource that presents the specified ...


4

I would say, as a general rule, that geographic limitations on this type of question are not appropriate here. Asking for what's popular in a specific geographic area will produce results which are only useful to a thin sliver of future visitors, and that's enough to sink that idea. Resource-recommendation questions are hard to get working correctly, and ...


3

I do not think there is any dispute about resource recommendations being on topic. But there is a difference of opinion about what this means. Your interpretation of the policy appears to be that voting to close any resource recommendations questions (RRQs) because they are primarily opinion based (POB) or too broad (TB) is a breach of the policy. ...


3

Good catch. I submitted an edit replacing reference-request with specific-reference.


3

Resource-recommendation questions are very hard to handle, and they were in fact deemed completely off-topic for several years until we managed to work out a consistent policy that lets the good stuff in without wreaking havoc. The result of the policy is at Are resource recommendations allowed? and you should read it carefully (and ideally its previous ...


3

On the flip side, I think having it in the preview makes perfect sense and just helps reinforce the point. The title should be sufficient to tell what kind of book the person is looking for (at least the subject area) and having the banner in the preview just makes it so the person who might answer it sees the banner before even reading the page. I think ...


3

I agree that many of the answers were simply un-detailed lists of a half-dozen books, but it is not the fault of the question nor the question-poser that the answers given were not in line with the rules. True, but the questions weren't locked because of their answers, they were locked because they - the questions themselves - are not good content for a ...


3

Your question is a bit confused but I think that you're mixing two types of questions and two separate policies, one of which did in fact change shortly after the question you referenced. At the time that question was asked, all resource-recommendation questions were considered off topic and were promptly closed, by community agreement. (And, while we're ...


3

Resource-recommendation questions are considered on-topic here $-$ subject to some tight restrictions. Basically, there is a segment of the community that feels (based on extensive experience coming from the early days of Stack Overflow) that open-ended list-based questions are a bad fit for the site, and that they should not be allowed at all. Back in 2013 ...


3

As mentioned, this is because there is a convention that all resource-recommendation threads should be made community wiki in their entirety, as agreed on this thread. The reasoning is that the voting pattern on resource-recommendation threads is very different to regular threads, since the votes often follow the quality of the book rather than the quality ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible