Hot answers tagged

25

Of your 65 answers to date, you've written 59 in the last ten days. If you continued at that pace for very long, you would become one of the most prolific answerers of questions in our community. You don't show up yet in this sitewide query because of the schedule on which its cache is updated, but if you poke around in dates in the past, you'll see that ...


18

To the right of every page is the Hot Network Questions list. If you note the list carefully, you'll find the question you linked to appear on the list: While not the clearest picture (looks better on my screen even after cropping it), there's your answer and the hot question. I have three such answers (3 links there) to my name due to the HNQ-effect, and ...


17

Part of the problem is that we are not always sympathetic to questions from the less experienced physics fans. In this case the question had attracted two downvotes and no answers by the time I added my rather brief answer. So it's no surprise that when someone took time to write a detailed and apparently considered answer that answer would impress the OP ...


17

Rob's answer covers most of the ground, but I'll chime in with some additional comments. I hope that I create enough reputation and put my Stackexchange reputation in my CV. So, the reputation points matter to me. To be honest, this is a bit of a weird goal. The specifics of your CV will depend on what type of job you're applying for, and indeed (as ...


15

Voting isn't really meant to be about satisfying the rules of the site. We have other mechanisms for discouraging/improving posts that don't follow the rules (like putting on hold). The intent of votes is that you upvote things which contribute to making this site a valuable resource for you, and downvote things which detract from that goal. In saying this, ...


14

That's nothing! I got 24 votes for a picture of a fly's foot :-) I suspect that the vast majority of the site members are interested amateurs rather than physics students or people being paid to do physics. As an (ex) scientist my favourite answers are the ones that are right at the edge of what I know, but these are exactly the answers that are going to be ...


14

Are there fewer votes on old answers? Using my recent Data Query Age-Score correlation, I gathered the average net scores of answers as a function of the number of days between the answer posting date and the question posting date. The figure below1 shows the result of the query: There is a slope at the early part (t ~< 200), suggesting that the most ...


14

Without specific instances, it is hard to say. But I have looked through your list of questions available to me (you may have deleted more, but I can't see those), I challenge your assertions. Of 27 questions you have asked, 7 have been marked as duplicate or off-topic. 3 of these questions were asked in 2014. For what it's worth, I agree with the close ...


13

Afaict this is caused by "hot network questions". A question that is approachable to laymen sees a burst of interest which gets it into the hot network questions list. This brings in a hoard of curious people from all across the network.


13

Honestly, asking people to upvote your answer is considered to be in bad taste. So the blunt answer is no, we won't upvote your answer because you asked us to. What you can do, however, is post a link to your answer in chat (if you have access to it) and invite people to read it and vote on it as they see fit. This is better than asking for upvotes since ...


12

Users are encouraged to vote. You decide what are quality posts on Phys.SE and what are not. Voting should always be based on content, never on previous votes. E.g. comfort-voting is strongly discouraged. Downvoting is an important part of weeding out bad content.


11

This seemed like an interesting question, so I figured I'd do some research, too. I started with Kyle's SEDE query, and made a few changes to it: Since the original question was about answering old questions with no answers yet, I figured it would be more meaningful to only look at the first answer to each question. Kyle's query bins the ages by day, but ...


11

The most-upvoted answer to that question is a great example of discussing mathematics as opposed to doing mathematics. The meat of the answer is [T]he real problem is not so much nonrenormalizability as high-energy behavior inconsistent with local quantum field theory. ... With gravity, this high-energy/short-distance correspondence breaks down. ... This ...


11

These statistics are included in the site analytics page (25k+ rep). There is generally a lull in posting rates in the summer and over the winter holidays, but the trend on the votes is less marked. Here are the (weekly-averaged) post and vote rates over the past three years: The data before 2015 do show a year-on-year increase, which has since ...


10

All disciplines have their specialised language i.e. terms that have precise meanings. Some of these terms my be unique to the discipline while others will be terms used in everyday life but repurposed to have a specific meaning that differs from the everyday meaning. This applies whether we are talking about physics or silkworm farming. To people skilled in ...


9

They are reversed, just after a period of maximum 24 hours. The serial upvoting detection script is a heavy one and is run daily. If you find such a case that is not reversed, let the moderators know in a custom flag.


8

The reason is that answers are ranked by score, and comments are ranked by time: useful answers get upvotes and move to the top bad answers get dowvotes and move to the bottom average answers stay in the middle So, downvotes help the best quality emerge. Comments have upvotes to express agreement and avoid multiple "I agree with the previous" comments. ...


8

An "unupvote" is the removal of an upvote, and consequently removes the rep gain associated with that vote. In my experience they are fairly rare. They are distinct from a down vote (though the effect on a question's score is essentially the same if you neglect that the voter had previously increased the questions score). Users are allow to cancel a vote ...


8

Who knows, maybe two other people upvoted the answer at the same time? I wouldn't worry too much about the number. Just refresh the page or open it in a new tab and see if that shows a more reasonable number. The SE database stores individual votes, and the post scores are derived from that, so if the number is wrong, it will work itself out next time the ...


8

Jen, I've seen that your posts are attracting a lot of downvotes, and as dmckee mentioned it is not due to a serial downvoter, so chances are that the quality of your questions are not upto the mark, I see that most of your questions are about blackholes and other pop-science stuff, It is great that you want to know about these topics, for which I would ...


8

Serial voting is well addressed in the Meta Stack Exchange post What is serial voting and how does it affect me?, and the short of it is that in essentially all the cases that matter, serial voting (which usually means someone going through your profile and either upvoting everything or downvoting a bunch of posts) gets automatically detected and reversed ...


8

You can get notified when posts are edited by using the Stack Overflow Extras extension script. However it's been declined on the mother meta. If you were able to change your vote on a post as much as you want, that allows some methods of gaming the reputation system, which is why it's not allowed. You get five minutes after you cast your vote to change it, ...


8

This is a typical check-my-work problem that IMO is not terribly interesting beyond answering a specific question by the OP. I didn’t downvote the question, but I did vote to close: there’s nothing intrinsically wrong with the question but I do think if people ask too many questions of this type the site will become a homework help site and will lose its ...


8

Only you can see the -1s that come from downvoting. If I look at your reputation history the SE hides the -1s from downvoting so I cannot see them. In principle some careful observation could detect that there had been a -1. For example if I happened to note that your reputation was 2000 yesterday, and you downvoted in the period since then, I could tally up ...


8

FWIW, the -4 negative reputation points for the 2 downvotes (which were cast before the upvotes) were exceptionally not counted because that would have resulted in a total non-positive reputation for the user.


7

No. Votes on answers (or questions) should be votes on answers (or questions) - upvoting or downvoting answers because of their authors instead of their content defeats the whole purpose of voting.


7

The standard reference for this is What is serial voting and how does it affect me? at Meta Stack Exchange. Note in particular that it does not give specifics on what will and will not trigger a serial-voting detection by the system. This is intentional. The more information that is available, the easier it is to game the system. In particular, if the ...


7

I think that you're making a big mistake in essentially assuming that ones own voting behavior should be based on that of others. To me, a person's vote is nothing more than that person's personal judgement of whether he/she/it likes the question or not. Consequently, the votes on a question say nothing more than "out of the people that viewed your question, ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible