2
$\begingroup$

While I was suspended for low quality questions. I asked astronomy.SE if it would be ok to write some of my low quality questions from here to a higher quality there? They said yes and I did and they did well. Now that a better question exist what can I do with that here?

https://astronomy.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/426/can-i-migrate-some-questions-from-physics-se-to-here-that-are-in-scope

Leaving them as here can only receive more down votes over time.

Should I leave my low quality questions alone in risk of getting suspended again?

Should I replace the old question here with the better question from there?

Should I asked a moderator to delete the questions?

Should I link them together with their link?

What should I do?

Here is the first time I asked this question here. What do sun spots look like under the surface of the Sun?

Here is where I re asked it in astronomy.SE. https://astronomy.stackexchange.com/questions/24940/how-do-sunspots-move-seen-from-the-side/24944#24944

$\endgroup$
6
$\begingroup$

Frankly, I would suggest that you should leave those old questions alone, and move on to newer questions $-$ it won't help very much to try and fix them, and the only thing you'll achieve is to get back into a deeper examination of questions which didn't do very well.

You should certainly add links as comments under the Physics versions to any existing Astronomy threads where you've asked similar questions, which is something you should always do in any case. But I would leave it at that.

I would also counsel you not to delete the old questions, though to some extent this is up to you. For users that have come up against an automated question ban, it is a distinctly bad idea to delete previous questions, regardless of whether they're downvoted or closed, since the system interprets that as yet another sign that the question was bad, and adds another black mark to the file.

For your case, however, the restriction was a moderator-indicated suspension rather than a question ban, which puts you on the human side of the system. Which is good: we don't hold grudges. From what I can tell, so long as the content you post going forward is of reasonably high quality, your previous suspension (and the posts that led to it) have a blank slate on top of them, and you shouldn't worry too much about them.

Instead, focus on keeping your question quality up: read deeply and carefully, and do your due diligence in searching for duplicates and for obvious answers and sources of information, and incorporate those results into the formulation of your posts. One of the main problems with the questions you churned out previously was to rush through things, so: Think Before You Post. Take it slow, and work carefully on each and every question. Eventually you'll be able to bash out a question quickly, but it will take some time to get there. In the meantime, focus on asking better questions instead of asking more questions faster.

$\endgroup$
7
$\begingroup$

Cross-posting questions is frowned upon. If you've managed to do so, the least you could do would be to include links connecting the corresponding questions, to save your readers the trouble or confusion of figuring out by accident what's happened. It's enough to add a comment like "Cross-posted to [other site]: [link]." It's polite to leave such a comment at both questions.

Leaving them as here can only receive more down votes over time.

That doesn't seem to be a real issue. You have been inactive on Physics for about two years, and during that interval your reputation changes have been neutral or slightly positive.

Should I leave my low quality questions alone in risk of getting suspended again?

The purpose of a suspension is to tell someone "hey, this thing you do: quit doing that." If a user has already figured out that some behavior was undesirable and stopped it on their own, there's not much point in a moderator suspension.

One of the reasons that the moderators keep the details of suspensions private is so that users can be judged based on their current contributions and behavior, rather than on their past. A user with a history of low-quality contributions who learns new things and starts to contribute higher-quality content is unlikely to earn a suspension for behaviors they have quit doing.

Leave the past behind; focus on the present.

Should I asked a moderator to delete the questions?

The moderators generally don't delete questions upon request.

$\endgroup$
  • 4
    $\begingroup$ Quick note on the purpose of a suspension: in addition to what you said, we do also sometimes use suspensions as a way of preventing a user's inappropriate behavior from appearing on the site. These are cases where we've already used messages and suspensions to try to get them to figure out that they shouldn't be doing something, and they don't get it and keep doing it anyway; at some point our approach shifts to "we don't trust you to behave so we don't want you around anymore". This is very much a last resort and is quite rare, but it does happen on occasion. $\endgroup$ – David Z Feb 11 at 23:24
  • $\begingroup$ @DavidZ Yes, absolutely. A user who returned from a suspension and resumed their old troublesome behaviors would find themselves unwelcome again, perhaps much more rapidly than before. $\endgroup$ – rob Feb 12 at 0:19
  • $\begingroup$ @DavidZ I don't need a year at a time to learn from my mistakes. I will try not to return to asking poor questions. $\endgroup$ – Muze Feb 12 at 2:11

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .